NASA Probing How Life Began on Earth to Alpha Centauri a Billion Years Older than Our Solar System (The Galaxy Report)

ESO Observatories

 

Today’s stories range from Largest Molecule yet Spotted in a Planet-forming Disc to
Astronomers Discover Mysterious Circular Ring of Intergalactic Origin, and much more. The Galaxy Report” brings you news of space and science that has the capacity to provide clues to the mystery of our existence and adds a much needed cosmic perspective in our current Anthropocene Epoch.

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Will the Gravity Telescope Reveal Alien Life to Einstein’s Biggest Blunder (The Galaxy Report)

ESO Observatories

 

Today’s stories range from Strange new Higgs particles beyond the Standard Model could explain shocking W boson result to New theory explains why aliens are avoiding Earth to Neighboring alien planets may Be in ‘Early-Earth’ stage of Life to NASA’s “Point of No Return,” and much more. The Galaxy Report” brings you news of space and science that has the capacity to provide clues to the mystery of our existence and adds a much needed cosmic perspective in our current Anthropocene Epoch.

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“How Did They Get So Big So Fast?”- Primordial Galaxies in a Colossal Mashup Near the Beginning of Time

 

Galaxy Cluster SPT2349 i

 

An ancient  megamerger of 14 relic starbursting galaxies could become the most massive structure in our Universe. “The fact that this is happening so early in the history of the universe poses a formidable challenge to our present-day understanding of the way structures form in the universe,” said Scott Chapman, an astrophysicist at Dalhousie University in Halifax, Canada, about a massive galaxy clusters found in 2018 that date to times as early as three billion years after the Big Bang, containing stars that formed at even earlier epochs. Each of these galaxies is forming stars between 50 and 1,000 times more quickly than our own Milky Way.

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Galaxy Clusters -“Dark Skeletons of the Cosmos”

Galaxy Cluster

 

Ancient galaxy clusters have been described as “the dark skeletons of the cosmos.” Astronomers at the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias (IAC) have found the most densely populated galaxy cluster in formation in the primitive universe. The researchers predict that this structure, among the largest astronomical objects in the Universe, which is at a distance of 12.5 billion light years from us, will have evolved becoming a cluster similar to the 1,300 galaxies of the Virgo Cluster, a neighbor of the Local Group of galaxies to which harbors our home galaxy, the Milky Way.

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How Did Gargantuan Galaxies Appear So Soon After the Big Bang?

 

C1-23152

 

How  monster galaxies appeared shortly (in cosmological time) after the Big Bang is one of the most debated questions of modern astrophysics. An elliptical galaxy 12 billion light years away defies conventional models of its origins: it must have accumulated its enormous mass within 1.8 billion years after the big bang, less than 13% of the present age of the universe. Most elliptical galaxies, such as C1-23152 at the center of a galaxy cluster, take many billions of years to reach their massive sizes. Hence the enduring mystery of how and why this monster object came to exist in the early universe.

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Astronomers Describe Their Discovery of “Alcyoneus” -The Largest Galaxy in the Universe

 

Galaxy Alcyoneus

 

One of the main questions the discovery of a giant radio galaxy (GRG) –active galactic nuclei that are very luminous at radio wavelengths– named Alcyoneus, after the son of the primordial Greek god of the sky, Ouranos, directly triggered is: “Why has Alcyoneus grown to such a large size,” asked astronomer Reinout van Weeren at the Leiden Observatory in an email to The Daily Galaxy. “The host galaxy of Alcyoneus and its central massive black hole have properties that are rather typical for radio galaxies,” van Weeren explained. “So Alcyoneus is not really special in this way. It is likely that Alcyoneus’ cosmic environment has played a role in allowing it to grow to its enormous size.

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