The Alien Observatory — Planet Only a Billion Years Younger Than Big Bang

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NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope precisely measured the mass of the oldest known planet in our Milky Way galaxy near the core of the ancient globular star cluster M4, located 5,600 light-years away in the summer constellation Scorpius. At an estimated age of 13 billion years, the planet is more than twice as old as Earth’s 4.5 billion years. It’s about as old as a planet can be. It formed around a young, sun-like star barely 1 billion years after our universe’s birth in the Big Bang. The ancient planet has had a remarkable history because it resides in an unlikely, rough neighborhood. It orbits a peculiar pair of burned-out stars in the crowded core of a cluster of more than 100,000 stars.

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“Everybody Knew It Had To Be There” –Missing Half of Normal Matter in the Universe Has Been Detected

 

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“Everybody sort of knows that it has to be there, but this is the first time that somebody – two different groups, no less – has come up with a definitive detection,” says Ralph Kraft at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics in Massachusetts.

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The Universe is Governed By Cycles –“LIGO Gravitational Waves Are Signals from the Recurring Birth of the Cosmos”

 

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Correlated noise in the two LIGO gravitational-wave detectors may provide evidence that the universe is governed by conformal cyclic cosmology (CCC) which assumes that the universe consists of a succession of aeons, says Roger Penrose of the University of Oxford. Penrose proposes that the apparent noise is actually a real signal of gravitational waves generated by the decay of hypothetical dark-matter particles predicted by CCC. Penose argues that a significant amount of this noise could be a signal of astrophysical or cosmological origin – and specifically CCC.

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