Could Dark Matter Be a Source of Light In the Universe?

"Chaos" --Our Spinning Cosmos May Be Losing Its Structure, Becoming More Disorderly

 

All the light in the observable universe provides about as much illumination as a 60-watt bulb seen from 2.5 miles away. And all the energy ever radiated by all the stars that ever existed is still with us, filling the universe with a sort of fog, a sea of photons known as the extragalactic background light.

And yet, a discovery in 2014 suggested that the source of light in the universe from known populations of galaxies and quasars is not nearly enough to explain observations of intergalactic hydrogen. The filaments of hydrogen and helium that bridge the vast reaches of empty space between galaxies that astronomers use as a “light meter” yielded a stunning 400 percent discrepancy.

The most exciting possibility is that the missing photons are coming from some exotic new source, not galaxies or quasars at all.”

“The most exciting possibility is that the missing photons are coming from some exotic new source, not galaxies or quasars at all,” said Neal Katz of the University of Massachusetts at Amherst about the discovery that the source of light in the Universe from known populations of galaxies and quasars is not nearly enough to explain observations of intergalactic hydrogen. Filaments of hydrogen and helium that bridge the vast reaches of empty space between galaxies that astronomers use as a precise “light meter” yield a stunning 400 percent discrepancy.

Exotic Dark Matter

“Astronomers estimate that the observable universe — a bubble 14 billion light-years in radius, which represents how far we have been able to see since its beginning — contains at least two trillion galaxies and a trillion trillion stars,” writes Dennis Overbye  for “Out There” in New York Times. “Most of these stars and galaxies are too far and too faint to be seen with any telescope known to humans.”

It’s as if you’re in a big, brightly-lit room, but you look around and see only a few 40-watt light bulbs.”

In a 2014 study, The Photon Underproduction Crisis, published in The Astrophysical Journal, a team of scientists finds that the light from known populations of galaxies and quasars is not nearly enough to explain observations of intergalactic hydrogen. “It’s as if you’re in a big, brightly-lit room, but you look around and see only a few 40-watt light bulbs,” noted Carnegie Institute’s Juna Kollmeier. “Where is all that light coming from? It’s missing from our census.”

Arriving at a number on the amount of starlight ever produced has variables that make it difficult to quantify. But according to the new measurement, the number of photons (particles of visible light) that escaped into space after being emitted by stars translates to 4×10^84, or a lot.

Enter mysterious dark matter, which, suggests Katz, holds galaxies together but has never been seen directly, and could itself decay and ultimately be responsible for this extra light. “You know it’s a crisis when you start seriously talking about decaying dark matter!” he quips.

The great thing about a 400% discrepancy is that you know something is really wrong.”

“The great thing about a 400% discrepancy is that you know something is really wrong,” commented co-author and astrophysicist, David Weinberg of The Ohio State University. “We still don’t know for sure what it is, but at least one thing we thought we knew about the present day universe isn’t true.”

“The Hidden Signal” –Birth of Light in the Universe

It All Adds Up in the Early Universe

Strangely, this mismatch only appears in the nearby, relatively well-studied cosmos. When telescopes focus on galaxies billions of light years away and billions of years in its past, everything seems to add up. The fact that this accounting works in the early universe but falls apart locally has scientists baffled.

The light in question consists of highly energetic ultraviolet photons that are able to convert electrically neutral hydrogen atoms into electrically charged ions. The two known sources for such ionizing photons are quasars—powered by hot gas falling onto supermassive black holes over a million times the mass of the sun—and the hottest young stars.

“All the Light”– In the History of the Observable Universe

Missing Source of Ionizing photons

Observations indicate that the ionizing photons from young stars are almost always absorbed by gas in their host galaxy, so they never escape to affect intergalactic hydrogen. But the number of known quasars is far lower than needed to produce the required light.

“Either our accounting of the light from galaxies and quasars is very far off, or there’s some other major source of ionizing photons that we’ve never recognized,” Kollmeier said. “We are calling this missing light the photon underproduction crisis. But it’s the astronomers who are in crisis—somehow or other, the universe is getting along just fine.”

The mismatch emerged from comparing supercomputer simulations of intergalactic gas to the most recent analysis of observations from Hubble Space Telescope’s Cosmic Origins Spectrograph.

“The simulations fit the data beautifully in the early universe, and they fit the local data beautifully if we’re allowed to assume that this extra light is really there,” explained Ben Oppenheimer a co-author from the University of Colorado. “It’s possible the simulations do not reflect reality, which by itself would be a surprise, because intergalactic hydrogen is the component of the Universe that we think we understand the best.”

The Last Word –David Weinberg

“The most exciting potential interpretation of our 2014 result would be that decaying dark matter particles produce a background of X-rays and ultraviolet photons that keeps intergalactic hydrogen highly ionized even after the quasars have largely faded away,” wrote David Weinberg in an email to The Daily Galaxy.

“However,” he continued, “several papers have argued that the number of quasars in the low redshift universe is higher than we assumed in our paper, by a factor of several, and that these quasars alone are enough to explain the ionization that we see.

“I think the consensus of the community is that this higher quasar number combined with moderate uncertainty about the simulation predictions is enough that exotic explanations are not required — the “photon underproduction crisis” may not be completely resolved, but it’s no longer a crisis.

“Since Occam’s razor (and scientific experience) tell us that we should generally favor mundane explanations over exotic explanations, I think this “no-crisis” consensus is a reasonable way to read the current evidence.”

David Weinberg and Carnegie Institution

Image credit: The new version of Hubble’s deep image is shown at the top of the page  In dark grey you can see the new light that has been found around the galaxies in this field–the brightness of more than one hundred billion suns. The image tookresearchers at the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias almost three years to produce this deepest image of the Universe ever taken from space, by recovering a large quantity of ‘lost’ light around the largest galaxies in the iconic Hubble Ultra-Deep Field.

Curated by The Daily Galaxy Editorial Staff

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