New Tech: iPad to Launch a New Newspaper Era with “The Daily”

Inanintervie After months of top secret development, Rupert Murdoch's News Corp. appears poised to launch a digital newspaper for the iPad called "The Daily."

News Corp. has held news about the project close to the vest, but the Australian-born media mogul acknowledged its existence for the first time in an interview last week with his Fox Business Network.


Asked what "exciting projects" his global media and entertainment company was working on, the 79-year-old Murdoch cited The Daily but offered no further information about the iPad game changer.

Details about the project have been leaking out for weeks, however, and The New York Times, citing two employees who requested anonymity, said News Corp. intends to launch The Daily before the end of the year.

The Times said Sasha Frere-Jones, music critic at The New Yorker magazine, would become its culture editor. Others reported to be involved include Jesse Angelo, executive editor of Murdoch's New York Post, Richard Johnson, former editor of the Post's gossip page, and Greg Clayman, the former head of Viacom's digital division, who has been tapped to head business operations at The Daily.

In an interview in April with The Kalb Report, Murdoch called the iPad a "glimpse of the future."
"There's going to be tens of millions of these things sold all over the world," he said. "It may be the saving of newspapers because you don't have the costs of paper, ink, printing, trucks. "It doesn't destroy the traditional newspaper, it just comes in a different form," he added.

"You'll find, I think, most newspapers in this country are going to be putting up a pay wall," he said, dismissing arguments that readers used to getting news on the Internet for free would be reluctant to pay.

News Corp. chief digital officer Jon Miller told top technology and media executives at a gathering in Aspen, Colorado, in July that the iPad may allow the news industry to start charging for content online after years of giving it away for free.

"I think we're seeing a fundamental shift in where content is consumed and it's on to these kinds of devices," he said. "These tablets are heavy media consumption devices, much more than the Web by itself and even smartphones."

Jason McManus via AFP and www.physorg.com

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